Sedap Durian Review: Seedless Durian & Cempedak Goreng with creamy fillings and crispy crust

Sedap.
The size of the durian goreng

My first bite of the durian fritter by Sedap Durian was cautious because I’m 1) scared it’s still too hot and 2) scared I might bite on the durian seed.

Both fears didn’t materialise because 1) the fritter arrived warm and 2) there was no seed!

This review ought to end here, because I was (durian) shell-shocked that there wasn’t a seed. I ate a second fritter to double confirm. Yup, still no seed.

But here’s a review anyway.

I see no seed

The Durian Goreng, which is essentially durian pulp encased in a fried outer shell, has been an offering by Sedap Durian, a brand by halal-certified J&C BAKERY, since May this year.

Durian Goreng
Photo by The Halal Eater.

Truthfully, I’ve never had a durian fritter before but I expected the experience to be similar to its other pungent counterpart: the cempedak goreng.

All the cempedak goreng I’ve had in the past have seeds in them as the fruit is fried whole with some batter coating.

Sedap Durian’s version of the Cempedak Goreng, however, also has no seed in it. More on this later.

Durian Goreng filling
Photo by The Halal Eater.

Back to the Durian Goreng. Because there wasn’t any seed, eating it was significantly easier: just take a bite or pop the whole thing in your mouth.

Each piece is about 3 to 4 inches long, just slightly bigger than a standard mini eclair.

The D24 puree inside is smooth, creamy, and suspiciously sweet so I’m curious if there’s sugar added.

The size of the durian goreng
Photo by The Halal Eater.

Outside, the crust is fried to a golden crisp and has a choux-like texture and flavour, especially if it’s cooled down to room temperature.

I don’t mind that the crust is light and airy this way, but if you prefer a crispier texture, just pop the fritters into an air-fryer for five minutes to revive the crunch.

Cempedak Goreng

More recently, Sedap Durian introduced Cempedak Goreng as a July special so it might be seasonal.

Similar to its durian brother, this fritter is also seedless and comes in the same crispy coating.

The only noticeable difference is its shape; it is slightly rounder whilst the durian goreng is more oblong.

Cempedak Goreng by Durian Sedap
Photo by The Halal Eater.

Bite into the Cempedak Goreng and you’ll encounter yet another surprise: a molten, creamy core of cempedak puree.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always eaten cempedak in its fibrous form so a creamy, almost custard-like version takes some getting used to.

That’s not to say the Cempedak Goreng isn’t good. The first fritter definitely has shock value, but once I’ve gotten past my initial inhibitions, the Cempedak Goreng was guiltily moreish.

Overall, both the Durian Goreng and Cempedak Goreng are unexpectedly delicious which make them dangerously addictive. Just don’t fall into the temptation of eating them all at once.

How much and where to buy

Here are the prices:

  • Durian Goreng (S$13 for 10 pieces)
  • Cempedak Goreng (S$13 for 10 pieces)

Additional delivery charges are applicable. Self-pick-up is also available at Woodlands Loop and Joo Chiat Road.

To place an order, Whatsapp Sedap Durian at +65 8798 0929 or click here.

For more information, check out Sedap Durian Instagram page.

Check these out for more tea break ideas:

The Fabulous Baker Boy is now MUIS halal-certified; serves pastries, cakes & all-day brunch
Bhai Sarbat goes online; now delivers its legendary teh tarik islandwide

Top image by @vincentfoodstagram on Instagram.



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